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tumbleweed
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22-04-2018, 04:16 PM

Batemans home of Rudyard Kipling

Bateman's is a Jacobean Wealden mansion constructed in 1634








https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bateman%27s
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Gnasher
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23-04-2018, 01:38 PM
What a gorgeous glorious house. I love Rudyard Kipling's works - poems and stories, particularly the Just So Stories. If is an incredible poem - so true, and the Jungle Book is one of my favourite all time reads.

Thank you tumbleweed for posting these beautiful photographs.
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Losos
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23-04-2018, 04:15 PM
Just look at the height of those chimneys does anyone know why they were so tall the 'elf 'n safety' brigade wouldn't allow that today

Nice house and very nice gardens.
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Gnasher
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25-04-2018, 07:44 AM
The taller the chimney the better the draw, so it could be because Jacobean fireplaces were often very large open grates, not inglenooks, often in the middle of a large room, hence possibly the need for a higher chimney. Also Jacobean houses tended to have steep pitched roofs, so perhaps again a taller chimney was required to ensure the fire down below did not smoke? I am guessing here, but as someone who has had open fires all her life and lived in old houses I have learned quite a lot about the little anomalies of fireplaces and chimneys!!
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Losos
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25-04-2018, 09:24 PM
Originally Posted by Gnasher View Post
I have learned quite a lot about the little anomalies of fireplaces and chimneys!!
That does make sense, we have a small fireplace which we've never used. In previous homes we've had an 'open' fire which is nice in winter but a lot of work and I'm too old now
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tumbleweed
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25-04-2018, 11:17 PM
another view



or is this edit cheating. same picture with the two people removed.



which do you prefer?
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Losos
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26-04-2018, 06:30 PM
Originally Posted by tumbleweed View Post
which do you prefer?
The one without the people always
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griff
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20-05-2018, 07:11 PM
What a beautiful house and lovely photos
Harvey, agreed, open fires lovely but I can't be bothered with building them, cleaning the ashes and I always remember having to black my exes woodburner...eughhh
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Gnasher
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21-05-2018, 08:04 AM
Definitely without! Simply could not live without a fire - preferably huge inglenook! We have an inglenook but unfortunately with a woodburner. It really does not cause much work at all. I get a huge amount of pleasure bringing back fallen wood every day when walking Ben plus the woodburner heats the water as well on top of the oil fired boiler so we always have boiling hot water which means we save money as we have a hot fill clothes washer and dishwasher.
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brenda1
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25-05-2018, 01:31 PM
Hello, I contacted Batemans as I was interested as well to find out about the tall chimneys and this is what they have said:

Dear Brenda,

Many thanks for your enquiry. Regarding the chimneys at Bateman's, I don't think there is a definitive/scientific answer as such.

I think it was very much the fashion of that period of time in architecture. That later Tudor and early Jacobean period often produced tall chimneys. Hampton Court for example is full of such examples.

Regarding Bateman's itself, we do suffer from a mini-micro-climate down here in the Dudwell Valley. As a result trying to get a fire to draw here is very difficult. The fireplaces and chimneys have been adapted over the years to try and help get a better fire and draw. It may well have been in their mind when the house was designed and built. The height of the chimneys to help get over the concerns of the house been hunkered down in the valley.

I don't feel that is a great answer to your enquiry, but it's all I can surmise I'm afraid.
Many thanks,
Gary
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