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Allyouneedislove
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Location: Texas, USA
Joined: Jan 2018
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04-01-2018, 12:37 AM
I said that the dog had a piece of the cat in it’s mouth so I knew it was the dog, after ppl on here where suspicious that I was wrong about who did. She did have a piece of the cat- a whole bunch of fur. Someone else in here keeps saying the cat was ripped to pieces- which isn’t what I said. The cat was still alive, but very badly injured and died before I got her to the vet. I didn’t hear the cat make any noise. Why would I come on this forum to reach out for help just to lie? Y’all always treat people this way that care for animals and try to problem solve when a problem arises with their animals?
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Allyouneedislove
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04-01-2018, 12:50 AM
Let me be clear- this dog used to sleep regularly with one of my cats. This is so unexpected and such a switch in her personality. I’m not lying or hiding something. I care about animals. I have fostered and rescued many. I have spayed and neutered over 20 dogs that didn’t belong to me on my dime just to help with the pet overpopulation. This was such a bizarre attack... that is why I came here to see if there was a similar story or an idea that I hadn’t thought of and just to learn more about how prey drive works. This was one of my most favorite cats I have ever owned. My family is heartbroken so please if you don’t have an idea, or advice that would improve the quality of life for my pets in the future just don’t comment.
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brenda1
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Location: Lancing West Sussex
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04-01-2018, 07:24 AM
Hi, have you asked your vet about a brain scan. Sometimes this can be the reason for a sudden change in temperament. A friend of mine had to have her dog pts for this. So sorry others have been unhelpful.
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Katewels
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07-01-2018, 02:33 AM
I have a hound that killed a rabbit in my backyard and believe me it happens quick. Your cat could have been sleeping or was taken by surprise and didn't have time to react. I feel for your situation. I don't have a cat at home but it scares me to death to think that my dog might get out and kill someone's cat (and she is a very sweet dog). I'm very careful to keep her secured but she has gotten out a couple times. Training is good but you can't usually change instinct.
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Gnasher
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07-01-2018, 09:57 AM
I am neutral as to whether or not this incident is fact or fiction, but one thing I would like to remind everyone that our beloved dogs - however sweet and gentle they appear to be - are the direct descendants of wolves. Their instinct, however deeply buried under tens of thousands of years of domestication, is ever-present, which is why responsible owners keep their dogs leashed around sheep and indeed in any public place if their recall is dodgy. Dogs are first and foremost carnivorous animals, and WILL kill - sometimes just for the thrill of the hunt, not for food - and that may mean next door's moggy innocently sunning herself on the fence falls victim. Which is exactly what happened to next door's cat a few years ago - Ben and Tai so nearly caught her tail and dragged her down, and I have no doubt whatsoever that they would have torn the cat in 2, which would have been extremely distressing for all concerned. Dogs are hunters and left to go feral and fend for themselves they will do just that. I don't understand why anyone should be so shocked that their hound has killed a rabbit, or their labrador killed a cat or whatever - it is NATURE, and if you don't like it, then don't have a dog. I will do all I can to ensure that Ben does not tear next door's cat to pieces, but if he does, that is life - I would be very sorry, but this is nature - red in tooth and claw. However well-trained our dogs are, they still have this predatory hunting instinct and we are being unfair to them if we forget this.
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Pride-and-Joy
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08-01-2018, 03:16 AM
For all the nay-sayers, have you ever seen a dog swing a rope or stuffed toy back and forth, sometimes to the point where it launches across the room? Picture that as a cat in the mouth of a powerful 50+ pound dog and think about how quick the neck can be broken. I have experienced the traumatic scenario as the OP. It was a rescued Rottweiler that was perfect with people and other dogs but had a small animal prey drive that I missed a day too late. I now know the signs...incessant stalking of the safe room, etc. drive is strong enough to shake to kill, I don't believe
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gordon mac
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Location: oldham, UK
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09-01-2018, 03:03 AM
I have tried my best to avoid posting on this topic but here goes.
I would never bring an adult dog into my home to join my domestic pet set-up. You have no idea of it's previous behaviour, habits etc. Many people when surrendering a dog to a shelter will fail to tell the truth about the animal. A puppy is for me the only option as this can be closely monitored and controlled and potential problems nipped in the bud.
I have kept high prey drive, large dogs for over 50 years and currently have 4 dogs which work controlling vermin virtually every day. My one small dog is a very fiery tempered fell terrier and she will share her food with any of our five cats. It is for me all about consistent firm and fair training from puppyhood onwards. Even though I consider my dogs to be cat safe I would never leave them unsupervised in the presence of a cat as if you aren't there you just don't know what is happening.
If this post is to be believed in it's entirety then (although this view is likely to be unpopular on a dog orientated site) I would part company with the dog if a veterinary examination showed that it had no internal problems which could have caused the aberrant behaviour. By this I do not mean back to a shelter or charity where it's action could be repeated, causing distress to it's new owners and possibly death to some poor cat or small pet animal.
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brenda1
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09-01-2018, 09:00 AM
I agree totally with you Gordon. Having to help others let their dog go at the vets is the safest and kindest thing to do for the poor dog which is only doing what its brain tells it to do. Sad but true.
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Gnasher
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Location: East Midlands, UK
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09-01-2018, 11:32 AM
Good points Gordon ... Im slightly off side with you on putting a dog down for eating a cat. Having had dogs always with high prey drives I have seen some unfortunate incidents .. . My fault that they happened because I failed to remember that our domesticated dogs are still wolves under the skin ... I dont think it fair of us to have a dog put down because he has merely followed his instincts.

We are currently staying in our caravan in Norfolk and on the site there are free range chickens ... an excellent chance for some training of Ben! I had him on an extended lead but only about 8 ft in length. We walked calmly around a group of grazing chickens who took no notice of us ... but Ben was definitely extremely interested in them. He adopted a hunting stance, his whole nody frozen, his pupils dilated, fixated on those chickens. A sharp rebuke and tug on the lead snapped him out of it but there is no doubt in my mind that off leash there would be at least 1 dead chicken. I could NEVER train this strong prey drive reliably out of Ben ... should I destroy him were I irresponsible and let him off leash around livestock?
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Trouble
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09-01-2018, 01:12 PM
The OP is looking for a guarantee that her dog will never repeat it's actions and the only way to guarantee that is to put the dog to sleep as I said back in post 18.
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