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nic2410
Dogsey Junior
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Location: Leeds UK
Joined: Oct 2006
Posts: 46
Female 
 
27-10-2006, 10:05 AM

will puppy grow out of biting?

I have a gorgeous little chihuahua jack russell cross puppy, she is 10 weeks old and I have had her for 2 weeks. The only problem is that she bites, I don't mean just chewing (she has plenty of toys for this) but she snaps and bites when playing and it really hurts. People have told me that she will grow out of it when she loses her baby teeth but I don't want her to think it is OK in case she doesn't. I have tried yelping, putting her on her own, giving her toys when she is biting but none of it works, it is driving me mad because I want to enjoy playing with her instead of constantly having to put her in a different room.
Please tell me there is light at the end of the tunnel!
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Foxy
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27-10-2006, 10:15 AM
Yes I would say she will grow out of it - she's still only a baby and I think nearly all dogs do this. I remember my dog doing it when he was puppy and he's fine now
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teenytiny
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27-10-2006, 10:18 AM
I now know im not on my own here!!!!!

I have a 9wk old staffy x american bulldog and he snaps and bites and im beginning to give up hope here! Like you, i have tried everything. Ive yelped, ive put him out the room, ive given him toys/chews to discourage him etc. ive got the vets again on tuesday for his 2nd jabs so im going to ask for advice then.

Please let me know if you find something that works and i will do the same!

I have put a collar on georgie today and when he bites im going to take hold of his collar and tell him no biting.....i'll let you know if that works.....
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Meg
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27-10-2006, 12:02 PM
Hi nic biting is normal behaviour in puppies, if a puppy doesn't bite there is something wrong with it . Puppies bite for a number of reasons, to explore the world around them/during play and when teething.

Biting is best curbed and channelled in the right direction when the puppy is small, he should be encouraged to bite ever more gently until no pressure is exerted at all . The best way to do this is to teach bite inhibition so that as the puppy grows up and develops powerful jaws, should he bite for any reason (like if he is in in pain/at the vets being treated /gets accidentally hurt) he will have been taught never to sink his teeth into human skin.


Teaching a puppy bite inhibition takes time and patience and won't be achieved in just a few days also everyone in the household needs to adopt the same approach.

Link to teaching bite inhibition ..
click here

If your puppy is teething try freezing a large carrot and giving that to him to chew, it is soothing to the gums
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DobieGirl
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27-10-2006, 12:18 PM
and if she is anything like Roxy she will find your yelping highly amusing and make a lunge for you

seriously though it really does calm down, we tried the firm 'no' approach, combined with time outs and replacing fingers/arms with toys and we got there eventually.
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squibber
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28-10-2006, 12:25 AM
Some breeds seem to be bitier pups than others and I'd count Jack Russells in this category! However, having been where you are a year ago (with a Jack Russell!) and now having a dog who wouldn't dream of closing his teeth on a human, trust me, this phase does come to an end even if not overnight.

Follow the tips in the bite inhibition link and be absolutely consistent about whatever approach works best. I didn't find yelping any help at all despite it working very well on some dogs. A sharp "ah-ah!" did, sometimes followed up with a firm "no biting!!" with the emphasis on "biting".

I've found that pups are at their bitiest when over-tired and often they get so over-tired with the excitement of a biting session that they can't wind down enough to have the nap they so desperately need. At under 12 weeks, a pup should be doing a lot of sleeping because this is essential for their development. So when they get over-tired, ensure that the atmosphere at home is absolutely calm and take toys and distractions away. Quietly put the pup in its basket or crate and speak to it in a soft and reassuring tone 'till it drops off to sleep.
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Lynn
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28-10-2006, 06:48 AM
We have the same problem with our pup.He does still bite as he is only just beginning to lose his baby teeth,we have found over the last few weeks he likes to mouth where he is teething it is painful but I give him a tea towel with knots in soaked in water then wrung out and put in the freezer,because he is a large dog he needs something bigger.You can buy something from PAH that you run under the tap and wring out and freeze which would probably suit your smaller puppy.I can only describe it as a small looking colourful caterpillar.
He also bites in play and still likes our trousers etc., for which he then gets excluded consistency does work.
We also found like Squibber when tired the behaviour gets worse,we put him out in the kitchen and most times he falls alseep,which means he was overtired.
As everyonme else has said it does get better but not overnight.
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SBT
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28-10-2006, 07:52 AM
Originally Posted by Minihaha View Post
Hi nic biting is normal behaviour in puppies, if a puppy doesn't bite there is something wrong with it . Puppies bite for a number of reasons, to explore the world around them/during play and when teething.

Biting is best curbed and channelled in the right direction when the puppy is small, he should be encouraged to bite ever more gently until no pressure is exerted at all . The best way to do this is to teach bite inhibition so that as the puppy grows up and develops powerful jaws, should he bite for any reason (like if he is in in pain/at the vets being treated /gets accidentally hurt) he will have been taught never to sink his teeth into human skin.



Teaching a puppy bite inhibition takes time and patience and won't be achieved in just a few days also everyone in the household needs to adopt the same approach.

Link to teaching bite inhibition ..
click here

If your puppy is teething try freezing a large carrot and giving that to him to chew, it is soothing to the gums
Yes minihaha is 100% correct, your puppy just needs to learn bite inhibition, it takes time.
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Heidi1
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Location: Newcastle
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Female 
 
28-10-2006, 09:55 AM
Hi
I can definitely say it does take time. Our pup is 5 months and has improved but still does it but less often. Time out in the kitchen is the only thing that seems to help as everything else he sees as a game. Everyone I've spoken to says they do grow out of it with time and training but it does seem to take a long time. Most people with pups I know seem to have the same problems. Hang in there.
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