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stuwilcox96
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24-01-2016, 10:40 AM

Separation anxiety (Lexi the Shar pei)

does anyone know of any good dog cages my dog cant escape from we have had a metal cage which she managd to bend and escape. cheers thanks all
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stuwilcox96
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24-01-2016, 10:45 AM
could anyone help me I have a 4 yr old sharpei which suffers with separation anxiety. we bought her a metal cage and she has escaped from it and goes crazy when we are not there. does anyone know of a good dog cage which would keep her calm and feel safe and not escape. thanks
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SusieL
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24-01-2016, 11:18 AM
You need to do intensive 'alone training'. A dog crate is not a real answer to the problem .
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Azz
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24-01-2016, 03:03 PM
Dogs should not be left in locked crates - they should only ever really be 'locked' when it's for the safety of the dog (such as if needed for taking them to the vet).

Please see this article on how to use dog crates.
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Trouble
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24-01-2016, 03:09 PM
Mine are in locked crates every night, they've never come to any harm. If the dog is causing havoc chewing and destroying stuff when left alone she'll be better off in a covered crate than chewing through electrical wires. Dog health do really good quality crates but if the dog is determined to get out you may need to reinforce the joins with screw links
http://www.doghealth.co.uk/collectio...door-dog-crate
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brenda1
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25-01-2016, 09:13 AM
DESTRUCTIVENESS & SEPERATION ANXIETY
Dogs left on their own too long get up to mischief, more so if they are rescue dogs, as they have probably come from a disturbed back ground. Also if they are very young, boredom can set in as having been taken from their litter mates they have no one else to play with. It is usually done as soon as you leave the house. The destruction can be through separation anxiety or for something to do. It is done then because of boredom. Even if you have taken your dog out for exercise they can still be destructive because the only thing that you have worn out is the body and not the brain, so some form of training is useful when out so that the dog is given an overall workout of body and mind. When leaving the house break down your departure by doing everything in a slow manner. First put on shoes, then do something else, then pick up keys/handbag, then do something else. Leave the radio on early in the day so that the dog doesn’t take that as a key to you going out if you only put it on as you leave the house. Give the dog something to do e.g. a hollow bone filled with treats/cheese/small biscuits. Sometimes they can be filled with paste or cream cheese; this gives the dog something to really work at. The toy called a kong is also useful for filling. Make sure that it is the appropriate size so that the dog can’t swallow it, also when the dog has finished with it give it a rinse out so that anything left behind doesn’t go off. If leaving him in an enclosed space, ensure that his collar can’t get caught up on anything. Gradually desensitise him to your leaving by putting him in another room for awhile, when you are in, so that he learns to get used to his own company. Some people think that another dog for company is a good idea, but you must be careful that you don’t end up with twice as much of a problem, as they could wind each other up. Introduction to a crate can be of use. Some dogs like their own den but they must not be left for too long when first using one and it must be done gradually over a few days when you are in to supervise him. The use of a crate introduced early on in a puppy’s life makes it easier to leave them when they are older. Make sure that the bedding is not easily destroyed. Something to occupy him while he is in there is always a good idea. The main thing to remember is that it all takes time and nothing is cured overnight. So be patient and persevere.
SEPERATION ANXIETY
There are many ways that a dog can show that it is unhappy when it is left on its own. Destruction, soiling the house, barking, whining, howling, trying to get out and many other behaviours that the owner may come across. All are distressing for the dog, and the owner, when they return to find their house destroyed and the neighbours complaining. First explain to the neighbours that you are trying to seek help in the problem and then sit down and take a deep breath and go over what you think may have caused the dog to be unhappy at being left.
To overcome this problem try the following first, take the dog out for some exercise, not too much, as this will only make the dog more hyper, then do lots of training sequences. i.e.: recalls on lead, sits at curbs, concentrated heelwork on the lead, down stay on lead with a short distance between you and the dog on lead, (no playing with a ball/toy). Then go home and make the dog lie down in its bed, in your eye line, while you make a drink. Put the cup/mug in the sink but don’t wash it up. Still keep an eye on the dog and start to gather together all that you need for going out, without the dog. Keep making trips to the car and then back inside the house. Do all this in a very laid back manner. If possible make sure that the dog can’t see you go when you are ready to leave. Go upstairs and pretend to do something up there and then come back down again and do something else, all this time the dog must remain in its bed. Eventually leave quietly without making a fuss of the dog or speaking to it. Stand outside for a while to see if you can hear anything. If you can then go in immediately and put the dog back in its bed, without speaking to it and leave. Again stand outside and listen, repeating if necessary.
Another way of making the dog think that you are still home, is to record sounds that you would normally be making during the day when the dog is downstairs in its bed i.e. hoovering, flushing the loo, singing when doing housework, talking to someone on the phone, out of the dogs view etc. All this makes the dog think that you are still in. If possible put the tape recording on a loop so that it continues to play quietly in the background out of sight of the dog.
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brenda1
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25-01-2016, 09:15 AM
The above may help you. There is never a quick fix for this problem. Esepcially at the age she is. The problem has become ingrained but you still can change it but with lots of patience. Good Luck with her. How long have you had her? Also look at how much protein she is having. This could help.
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chlosmum
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25-01-2016, 04:24 PM
Originally Posted by brenda1 View Post
The above may help you. There is never a quick fix for this problem. Esepcially at the age she is. The problem has become ingrained but you still can change it but with lots of patience. Good Luck with her. How long have you had her? Also look at how much protein she is having. This could help.
Hi Stuart! I also have a Shar-Pei who's now 2.5 years old. She's the second one I've owned.

Brenda has given you some good advice which I won't add to except to say my first Pei suffered from mild separation anxiety when she was young, but using the method that Brenda has suggested, she grew out of it and could be left alone for several hours without any problems.

Personally, I would never use a crate for a Pei, because they're a guardian breed and restricting them in a crate prevents them from doing the job they were originally bred for which was to guard and protect their family and property. It's a trait that's still very strong in the breed and to be denied that freedom causes stress.

My Pei has the run of the house, but in her case she has a Mini Schnauzer brother to keep her company. He's a very confident, somewhat feisty boy but "big sister" is quite protective of him and makes sure he doesn't get into trouble either in the house or when we're out, which I think helps to satisfy her inherent traits.

Like Brenda, I'd be interested to know more about Lexi ... how long have you owned her, your normal daily routine and what you feed her as I'm not quite sure how much you know about the breed.

Pei are wonderful dogs as I'm sure you've found out, but they are also "different" from most other breeds and do take a lot of understanding!

Good luck and lots of photos please of your Pei girl!
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chlosmum
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25-01-2016, 04:26 PM
Originally Posted by brenda1 View Post
The above may help you. There is never a quick fix for this problem. Esepcially at the age she is. The problem has become ingrained but you still can change it but with lots of patience. Good Luck with her. How long have you had her? Also look at how much protein she is having. This could help.
Hi Stuart! I also have a Shar-Pei who's now 2.5 years old. She's the second one I've owned.

Brenda has given you some good advice which I won't add to except to say my first Pei suffered from mild separation anxiety when she was young, but using the method that Brenda has suggested, she grew out of it and could be left alone for several hours without any problems.

Personally, I would never use a crate for a Pei, because they're a guardian breed and restricting them in a crate prevents them from doing the job they were originally bred for which was to guard and protect their family and property. It's a trait that's still very strong in the breed and to be denied that freedom causes stress.

My Pei has the run of the house, but in her case she has a Mini Schnauzer brother to keep her company. He's a very confident, somewhat feisty boy but "big sister" is quite protective of him and makes sure he doesn't get into trouble either in the house or when we're out, which I think helps to satisfy her inherent traits.

Like Brenda, I'd be interested to know more about Lexi ... how long have you owned her, your normal daily routine and what you feed her as I'm not quite sure how much you know about the breed.

Pei are wonderful dogs as I'm sure you've found out, but they are also "different" from most other breeds and do take a lot of understanding, but once you do you couldn't wish for a more loyal dog!

Good luck and lots of photos please of your Pei girl!
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