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ClaireandDaisy
Dogsey Veteran
ClaireandDaisy is offline  
Location: Essex, UK
Joined: Jan 2008
Posts: 14,147
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16-02-2011, 09:22 AM
I cannot BELIEVE there are 5 pages on how to deal with alligators.
When I lived in Africa I had no trouble stopping my dog chasing wildebeest.
When I lived by a lake in Britanny I had no trouble stopping my dogs chasing the coypu.
Now I live in sunny Essex I have no problem stopping them chasing the swans in the park .
Come on, guys.
You train your dog.
You train solid recall.
You use your recall.
What on earth is the problem?
Recall is basic. If you can`t teach your dog recall, keep it on a lead. To teach recall, look up one of the hundreds of threads on it.
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promarc
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Location: burnley, Northwest
Joined: Nov 2010
Posts: 520
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16-02-2011, 09:32 AM
Originally Posted by ClaireandDaisy View Post
I cannot BELIEVE there are 5 pages on how to deal with alligators.
When I lived in Africa I had no trouble stopping my dog chasing wildebeest.
When I lived by a lake in Britanny I had no trouble stopping my dogs chasing the coypu.
Now I live in sunny Essex I have no problem stopping them chasing the swans in the park .
Come on, guys.
You train your dog.
You train solid recall.
You use your recall.
What on earth is the problem?
Recall is basic. If you can`t teach your dog recall, keep it on a lead. To teach recall, look up one of the hundreds of threads on it.
well said and totally agree
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mishflynn
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Location: Cardiff, UK
Joined: Aug 2007
Posts: 6,033
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16-02-2011, 09:32 AM
I agree its abit pathetic.Just a xcuse to troll imo.

be a RESPONSIBLE dog owner & dont take your dog to unsafe areas.

I dont test my dogs recall by walking on the motorway.

Im actually disgusted that any "dog lover" ( to say again Dogesy the site for do lovers-saysso on top of page)
would want to walk or let a dog roam free in a area populated with alligators.

Its really not hard is it, dont be so lazy & put some effort in & go somewhere safe.
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SLB
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Location: Nottingham, UK
Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 9,540
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16-02-2011, 09:49 AM
Originally Posted by ClaireandDaisy View Post
I cannot BELIEVE there are 5 pages on how to deal with alligators.
When I lived in Africa I had no trouble stopping my dog chasing wildebeest.
When I lived by a lake in Britanny I had no trouble stopping my dogs chasing the coypu.
Now I live in sunny Essex I have no problem stopping them chasing the swans in the park .
Come on, guys.
You train your dog.
You train solid recall.
You use your recall.
What on earth is the problem?
Recall is basic. If you can`t teach your dog recall, keep it on a lead. To teach recall, look up one of the hundreds of threads on it.
Well said.
Steve Irwin managed to take his dog, Sue, out on croc and gator rescues and she managed to live into her teens. Maybe a little research on gators and their habits as well as the above may serve you better than an e-collar, also buy a fence...

Adam - you cannot pass on information that you have read, unless you have truly experienced it, you cannot praise it's strengths - dogs are NOT robots, they are all different!

Sadie would probably (she hasn't come across one as far as I know) badger a grass snake until she got bitten. Benjie would stand barking at it until we moved him on and Louie would probably think it was a toy and play bounce around it.

IMO for a dog to learn, it has to experience. Albeit you can't let your dog go in a pen with a gator or a poisonous snake - you'd be an idiot. But you could always prevent nature happening my diving the 8 miles to a safe place and building a fence around your yard and keeping the dog on the lead.
Louie, my 9 month old ESS x lab has very strong working instinct, I am working on this with Whistle recall. So far, we're about 50% there...but we've only been working on it a few weeks.
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Wysiwyg
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Posts: 5,551
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16-02-2011, 10:34 AM
Originally Posted by wilbar View Post
I've had a quick google of alligator attacks on dogs in Florida. The link below suggests common sense ways of keeping safe from alligators.

http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw230

It appears that dogs are attacked occasionally, & more often than humans, because humans are considered too big to be prey, whilst a dog is not. But obviously the attacks on dogs are rare enough to make headline news when they do happen though!

And the article also suggests that alligators can scale fences that are not high enough, so that anyone with children is advised to make sure the fencing around their yard is high enough to prevent alligators getting in ~ why can't the same apply to dog owners?

Keeping dogs on lead around the water's edge, stopping children from playing too near the water, not feeding alligators, not simming in the rivers,creeks etc, are all just common sense ways to prevent alligator attacks.

I really don't see why anyone would (or could) have to resort to inflicting electric shocks on a dog in the interests of trying to make a dog avoid alligators. It would be an extremely unreliable & potentially dangerous method to use ~ not to say the emotional fallout & other damage it could do to the dog ~ when just common sense seems to work for most people!
Thanks Wilbar, good post there and interesting info

I agree with Common Sense - but sadly, as per the poem about the disappearance of common sense, it isn't often around

Wys
x
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Wysiwyg
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Location: UK
Joined: Jul 2004
Posts: 5,551
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16-02-2011, 10:35 AM
Originally Posted by ClaireandDaisy View Post
I cannot BELIEVE there are 5 pages on how to deal with alligators.
When I lived in Africa I had no trouble stopping my dog chasing wildebeest.
When I lived by a lake in Britanny I had no trouble stopping my dogs chasing the coypu.
Now I live in sunny Essex I have no problem stopping them chasing the swans in the park .
Come on, guys.
You train your dog.
You train solid recall.
You use your recall.
What on earth is the problem?
Recall is basic. If you can`t teach your dog recall, keep it on a lead. To teach recall, look up one of the hundreds of threads on it.
Agree too, again, common sense is required

Wys
x
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Crysania
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Crysania is offline  
Location: Syracuse, NY USA
Joined: May 2008
Posts: 1,843
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16-02-2011, 11:16 AM
Originally Posted by Wysiwyg View Post
At some stage, considering the info we are given about living with dogs in the everglades, I'd say it was almost certain that a dog would become prey at some stage in its life.
For the record, I know some folks who have lived in the Everglades. It's not as bad as this guy is making it out to be. There are not alligators on every corner just waiting to eat you and your dog. And as long as you don't walk right along the water's edge, where alligators hide, you shouldn't have a problem.

See here's a neighborhood in the Everglades.




See how far away from water it is? They suggest you stay 10-15 feet away from the water, further during mating season. I'd say that neighborhood is a good bit further away than 10-15 feet.

I really do think this guy was just here to stir up things.
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Meg
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Location: Dogsey and Worcestershire
Joined: May 2004
Posts: 49,472
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16-02-2011, 11:38 AM
Originally Posted by wilbar View Post
I've had a quick google of alligator attacks on dogs in Florida. The link below suggests common sense ways of keeping safe from alligators.

http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw230

It appears that dogs are attacked occasionally, & more often than humans, because humans are considered too big to be prey, whilst a dog is not. But obviously the attacks on dogs are rare enough to make headline news when they do happen though!

And the article also suggests that alligators can scale fences that are not high enough, so that anyone with children is advised to make sure the fencing around their yard is high enough to prevent alligators getting in ~ why can't the same apply to dog owners?

Keeping dogs on lead around the water's edge, stopping children from playing too near the water, not feeding alligators, not simming in the rivers,creeks etc, are all just common sense ways to prevent alligator attacks.

I really don't see why anyone would (or could) have to resort to inflicting electric shocks on a dog in the interests of trying to make a dog avoid alligators. It would be an extremely unreliable & potentially dangerous method to use ~ not to say the emotional fallout & other damage it could do to the dog ~ when just common sense seems to work for most people!
Yes exactly. And that good old thing common sense which seems to be sadly lacking in some cases.
If I lived on the side of the M25 motorway I wouldn't rely on training to keep my dogs (or children) safe, I would make sure the two things didn't come into contact with each other by erecting a barrier/moving/not having them in the first place.

From reading Dark Wolf's posts I get the impression advice and common sense are not being sought here, decisions on training methods had already been made and I think we were chosen to be the recipients of a lecture on the merits of e collar training.

I would never consider joining a forum for e collar users because I know it is a subject I have no wish to become involved with and I couldn't hope to change entrenched opinions or the views of those motivated by financial gain so what would be the point .

Originally Posted by Dark Wolf
I had no intention of coming on here to talk about e-collars, I was actually interested in reading the raw feeding section as I do this with my dogs.

In the process of signing up and waiting for my email, I went to the training section to see what people do. And somehow, I ended up on this thread.

I've read a few pages and it seems, from what I've read, that some people here are trainers? Is this correct?

If so, and I'm NOT trying to start a debate, I simply would like to know how you trainers would handle teaching a dog about alligators without the use of an e-collar.
If I did join a site just 'to read' another section I would do just that not say one thing and do another.
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Adam P
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Adam P is offline  
Location: UK
Joined: Mar 2010
Posts: 1,497
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16-02-2011, 12:21 PM
Originally Posted by Brierley View Post
I would never trust my dog's safety to a battery operated remote control that relies on being quick off the mark in unexpected circumstances to pick it up and find the button, let alone mess about with the levels it has on it
Once the dog is trained with it for this behaviour you don't need it.

Adam
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Adam P
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16-02-2011, 12:22 PM
Originally Posted by rune View Post
Leaving the handler to be eaten----EXCELLENT!!

rune
Hopefully you would see the dogs reaction and move as well lol.

I guess gators don't go after adult humans as much as dog anyway.

Adam
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