register for free
View our sister sites
Our sister sites
Our sister sites
Our sister sites
borzoimom
Dogsey Senior
borzoimom is offline  
Location: Virginia
Joined: May 2007
Posts: 268
Female 
 
21-05-2007, 07:09 PM

Feeding raw diet since 1984

I didn't know where to start with the so many threads on raw, so I thought I would type what I do etc.
The basic facts on raw are to feed an adult at 2 percent body weight- that translate to 1 percent twice a day. Ten percent of this should be organ meat ( chiicken livers, beef livers, tripe etc.) Sometimes I add veggies as they aid in digestion. My diets ( keep in mind for 100 pound dogs) is one pound of chicken ( allraw) usually using leg quarters, then in a processor I put raw eggs shell and all ( calcium), chicken livers, tripe, beef liver and usually a few baby carrots ( they like them the best). Process this, then add a rounded vitamin, and usually either hair of the dog ( rich in omega 3 and 6's) or vitacoat. I also add (for all 4) one cup of Solid gold-. ( i.e. 1/4 cup per dog). This mostly is for reasons- it soaks up the eggs and liver, and if I loose power ( I live on a mountain top) or have to travel like to shows etc, the dogs are use to having kibble 'if they have too..".
Preparing raw is just like handling your own raw meats before cooking. I wash my dog food bowls after feeding, and all utensils used to make the dinners. I use only a plastic cutting board, and never allowed when my child was younger to touch the food bowls while my dogs were eating..
While I got my first Borzoi 19 years ago, the fact is I have spent most of my adult life with German shepherds. Showing, training k9 and police work etc. I have found over the years of feeding raw ( the whole house converted in 1991, that my dogs are healthier- with less common problems dogs can have- dry skin, dandruff, poor heart conditions, and even arthritis. Chicken cartiledge is one of the highest to prevent bone problems- or at least making it manageable- like OCD, arthritis as mentioned and even ostroperosis. MY oldest Borzoi was injured as a pup of 4 months old running into a fence chasing his sister. We were told at 2 years old he would not make 5.. Uh he is 9 YEARS OLD! And the chicken and the chicken cartiledge is the credit for him to be able to manage his OCD that occured because of a break in a growth plate, and his throwing his weight into his shoulders and elbows etc after the accident causing OCD... Additionally- my rescue came here in sad shape- 20 pounds under weight, hyper thyroid, and a mess in skin. We placed here on thyroid medication- but in a year- not only is she off the medication with a healed thyroid, but beautiful coat etc and great in weight..
Reply With Quote
Evie
Dogsey Veteran
Evie is offline  
Location: N.Ireland
Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 3,251
Female 
 
21-05-2007, 11:38 PM
Thank you for posting this thread, it is full of info.
Do you feed bones of any sort other than the chicken legs?
Reply With Quote
borzoimom
Dogsey Senior
borzoimom is offline  
Location: Virginia
Joined: May 2007
Posts: 268
Female 
 
21-05-2007, 11:44 PM
I do not. My dogs never had a chicken allergy but I know what to feed if they do.
Beef bones are too thick and turkey bones there is a chemical in turkeys ( natural) but it causes sleepyness. ( sorry I cant remember what it is but it begins with a T.. )
I started using chicken because when I started raw, we didnt have the internet - just people that fed it for advice. Then later I found out chicken bones and cartiledge reselmbes "shark cartiledge" which as you know- sharks do not get cancer etc and absorbs quickly into the body. That is why I feed chicken leg quarter..
Reply With Quote
Lucky Star
Dogsey Veteran
Lucky Star is offline  
Location: Usually in a muddy field somewhere
Joined: Nov 2004
Posts: 20,089
Female 
 
21-05-2007, 11:48 PM
Very informative post there!

Do you mean tryptophan in turkey?
Reply With Quote
borzoimom
Dogsey Senior
borzoimom is offline  
Location: Virginia
Joined: May 2007
Posts: 268
Female 
 
21-05-2007, 11:54 PM
Originally Posted by Lucky Star View Post
Very informative post there!

Do you mean tryptophan in turkey?
THANK YOU!!! Thats it!!! lol...
Reply With Quote
Meganrose
Dogsey Veteran
Meganrose is offline  
Location: Lake District, Cumbria.
Joined: Feb 2006
Posts: 3,042
Female 
 
22-05-2007, 12:57 AM
Originally Posted by borzoimom View Post
I do not. My dogs never had a chicken allergy but I know what to feed if they do.
Beef bones are too thick and turkey bones there is a chemical in turkeys ( natural) but it causes sleepyness. ( sorry I cant remember what it is but it begins with a T.. )
I started using chicken because when I started raw, we didnt have the internet - just people that fed it for advice. Then later I found out chicken bones and cartiledge reselmbes "shark cartiledge" which as you know- sharks do not get cancer etc and absorbs quickly into the body. That is why I feed chicken leg quarter..
Some great stuff there - thank you
I don't know what the chemical is that you're referring to in turkey, but I do know that turkey skin can cause pancreatitis and is very dangerous to dogs that are susceptible to attacks.

I think while we are on the subject it may just be worth pointing out the dangers of feeding raw salmon (to those who may not be aware) as I see many people stating that they feed raw fish as a change to the raw meat.

Salmon Poisoning Disease can be a problem, through salmon being infected by rickettsial organism called Neorickettsia helminthoeca. It is carried through a parasite (a flatworm or fluke) called Nanophyteus salmincola in freshwater snails and salmonid fish. Infected snails are then ingested by salmon.

A dog that has ingested an infected salmon will have a sudden onset of symptoms 5-7 days later. Symptoms include lethargy and anorexia and the dog may have a temperature between 104-107 with persistent vomiting by the fourth day and bloody diarrhea. The symptoms may look similar to parvovirus. If left untreated, Salmon poisoning disease has a mortality rate of up to 90%.

This can of course be avoided by only feeding cooked salmon. (Sorry to hijack your thread, but I thought it important to mention)
Reply With Quote
borzoimom
Dogsey Senior
borzoimom is offline  
Location: Virginia
Joined: May 2007
Posts: 268
Female 
 
22-05-2007, 01:04 AM
Salmonilla is almost unheard of in dogs. I know you know dogs would eat carrion etc if having the chance. They have a higher body temp than we do to kill bacteria and more antibiotics as well.
Raw fish is excelent- I frequently add tapoli etc to my dogs diet, but its a rarity more than regular. The problem with salmon is that its so rich in fish oil that it causes stomach upset. If I give salmon- its with out the skin for this reason as the rest of the diet is balenced already in fat.. The other problem with some fish is although mackel is good for them, some bottom feeders have too much iron which can be a retained mineral if over fed. Rule of thumb here- if the fish has a thick skin- take it off. If scaled or filet- its fine..
Reply With Quote
Meganrose
Dogsey Veteran
Meganrose is offline  
Location: Lake District, Cumbria.
Joined: Feb 2006
Posts: 3,042
Female 
 
22-05-2007, 01:16 AM
Originally Posted by borzoimom View Post
Salmonilla is almost unheard of in dogs. I know you know dogs would eat carrion etc if having the chance. They have a higher body temp than we do to kill bacteria and more antibiotics as well.
Raw fish is excelent- I frequently add tapoli etc to my dogs diet, but its a rarity more than regular. The problem with salmon is that its so rich in fish oil that it causes stomach upset. If I give salmon- its with out the skin for this reason as the rest of the diet is balenced already in fat.. The other problem with some fish is although mackel is good for them, some bottom feeders have too much iron which can be a retained mineral if over fed. Rule of thumb here- if the fish has a thick skin- take it off. If scaled or filet- its fine..
I'd agree raw fish is excellent ..I feed my youngsters raw and fish is included. I don't know what the instances of actual Salmon poisoning in dogs are but I still feel it's worth mention as quote "“Salmon poisoning occurs most commonly west of the Cascade mountain range,” says Dr. Bill Foreyt, a veterinary parasitologist at Washington State University’s College of Veterinary Medicine. He adds, “Canids (dogs) are the only species susceptible to salmon poisoning. That’s why cats, raccoons and bears eat raw fish regularly with out consequence.”

and quote "Salmon Poisoning Disease is a potentially fatal condition seen in dogs that eat certain types of raw fish."

Sarah Hoggan, Washington State University, Class of 2001.
for the full article please follow the link; http://www.vetmed.wsu.edu/ClientED/salmon.asp

I'm all for raw feeding done properly but people also need to be informed of any potential risks so as to make an informed choice.
Reply With Quote
borzoimom
Dogsey Senior
borzoimom is offline  
Location: Virginia
Joined: May 2007
Posts: 268
Female 
 
22-05-2007, 01:21 AM
I believe it goes back to thickness of the skin in salmon and feeding bottom feeders with retainer minerals.
Example- going fishing my husband caught a large cat fish- thick in skin etc- but also retaining minerals- .. Although he was proud of " his catch" the dogs got none of it.. loll.. Much to their dismay..
Also-- venison has little fat and rich meat- I never found that to digest well either...
Reply With Quote
Mel
Dogsey Veteran
Mel is offline  
Location: Lincolnshire
Joined: Oct 2004
Posts: 2,852
Female 
 
22-05-2007, 09:22 AM
I have found that on the rare occasions that mine have had turkey they suffer from REALLY awful wind ...and believe me I mean nauseatingly dreadful, MUCH worse than usual ones. For this reason alone mine do NOT now get turkey

They do get lamb ribs when available though ...trotters and pigs ears and tails are also good

Thank you for a good post with lots of facts
Reply With Quote
Reply
Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 >


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools


© Copyright 2016, Dogsey   Contact Us - Dogsey - Top Contact us | Archive | Privacy | Terms of use | Top