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greyhoundrick
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Location: Phoenix, AZ, USA
Joined: May 2017
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15-05-2017, 12:27 AM

?: Older greyhound with behavioral problems

Hello everyone,

We have adopted greyhounds for 20+ years but have never had a situation like this.

We just adopted a 7 year old former racer, a female named Misty. She has been in a foster home but for a very short time.

When we met her she was very sweet and friendly and seemed low key.

We have had her for 2 months and she is a real handful. She is extremely high strung, very competitive with our other dogs and is very curious, gets into mischief and basically acts like a 6 month old puppy (or worse).

We can handle everything she does EXCEPT when she constantly chews up things when we leave her with our other 2 dogs to run errands, go to work, etc.

Our dogs are never left alone more than maybe 4 hours tops. We walk them all everyday for 30 minutes and they have a back yard to run, play, explore all the time.

We have "puppy proofed" our home (even though she is 7 years old) and no matter what we do she finds something to chew up. This includes furniture, towels, paper, boxes, etc.

We are considering muzzling her now. She has a plastic muzzle they used at the race track kennel, but are afraid she may go crazy with it on and cause even worse damage.

If you have any ideas, suggestions, and/or comments I would appreciate them very much. We are at our wits end.

thank you so much for your time and I am anxiously awaiting your input.

best to you all,

Rick
Phoenix, AZ
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Trouble
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Location: Romford, uk
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15-05-2017, 07:18 AM
Put her in a room where there really is nothing to chew except what you give her. Mine go in the utility room when I'm out, tiled walls and floor and literally nothing left lying around, all cables are behind appliances. The alternative is you could confine her to a crate when you go out. I wouldn't muzzle her when left home alone.
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greyhoundrick
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Location: Phoenix, AZ, USA
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15-05-2017, 02:34 PM
Originally Posted by Trouble View Post
Put her in a room where there really is nothing to chew except what you give her. Mine go in the utility room when I'm out, tiled walls and floor and literally nothing left lying around, all cables are behind appliances. The alternative is you could confine her to a crate when you go out. I wouldn't muzzle her when left home alone.
Thanks so much for your input!

We tried muzzling her early this morning for about an hour and that stopped her from chewing things, but will definitely take note of your suggestions. Maybe a crate would be best.

Thanks again for your help!

best to you,

Rick
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Dr. Dennis Thomas
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Location: Spokane, WA USA
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21-05-2017, 11:19 PM
I have seen a lot of dogs damage themselves trying to get out of a crate. If you decide to crate her, put her in it and watch her from a distance for a while and see what happens. Broken teeth, damaged claws and digits can be the result of a big dog trying to get out of a crate.

You might, for the meantime, try to find something to give her before you leave that will help her with the anxiety. Bach Flower Rescue Remedy, Valerian Root and calming essential oil blends might help take the edge. Remember, non of these recommendations are about resolving your problem, just about protecting your stuff while you are gone.

In order to get this resolved, you will need to dig deeper with the help of some professional. Trainers are great for counter-conditioning but still not effects at resolving the problem. I would look for some help from a holistic vet who can step back and find out the deeper root imbalances that are creating these behavior patterns. I like Chinese medicine for behavior patterns because it works with energy and everything, including behavior and emotions, are energetic in nature. Good luck.
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Chris
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Location: Lincolnshire
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21-05-2017, 11:26 PM
If the dog is an ex racing greyhound from a track, she is likely to be used to being kennelled so I doubt a cage will freak her out and she may well settle very well in one. The only way to is to try and see what happens, but as Dennis says, keep a watchful eye at first.

You don't say what she chews? If it's stuff laying around, the answer is obvious, but as you say you have puppy-proofed then I doubt that's the case. Provided she doesn't chew on doors, emptying off anything within reach in the kitchen and confining her to that one room while she is left may be worth a try.

Good luck, let us know how she gets on
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