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Anistel






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Dogs owned: Labradors
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Location: Spain
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04-06-2005, 06:56 AM   #11

Re: Barf and bloat


Hi I believe stress also plays a big part in bloat. 2 of my dogs have had it, first was Gwen when she was 3mths old recovering from parvo, she was on complete food then, then her mum Sweep when she was 6yrs old, she`d been fed raw for a couple yrs then & at that time one of my other dogs was ill, he died just a week later. Had a scare with Gwen just at the end of last yr & started giving her the nux vom straight away, by the time we got the vets her sides had gone down & she was ok I think raw food helps but in my case at least I`m convinced its the stress I`ve been under thats transfered to my dogs, cos each time its happened to them thats been the one common denominator. I while back I did read some research that was starting to suggest stress but I`m sorry can`t remember where now
Christine.



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Shadowboxer's Avatar
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Dogs owned: Boxers
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04-06-2005, 07:26 AM   #12

Re: Barf and bloat


Christine,
I agree completely that stress can cause bloat. I don't know of any specific research but I do know of dogs who have bloated with no apparent cause other than stress of one form or another. It is mentioned briefly in this article:http://www.globalspan.net/bloat.htm



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Dogsey Veteran
 
Dogs owned: Labradors
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04-06-2005, 08:06 AM   #13

Re: Barf and bloat


Hi S/B, great link The one I was reading was part of a study on bloat & I remember it saying they are paying more notice to stress being involved. One thing I couldn`t agree with more tho in the link you put up is knowing your dog so well that you`ll know straight away if somethings not right & get to vets asap. Each time its happened to my dogs its been different. First time Gwens side was silightly swollen but she was fine in herself & I honestly didn`t think it would/could happen to a pup. Second time with Sweep, her 2 sides looked ever so slightly swollen & it took me awhile to decide if they were or weren`t! again she was fine in herself. They each had to have emergency surgery, Gwens tum had started to twist & Sweeps was caught before it happened. Third time Gwen got restless & within about 10mins was trying to vomit & sides staretd to swell, I fell out of bed & started giving the nux vom while hub rang vet then as we got in car she started to be sick! By the time got to vets she was getting better but we stayed at vets for a while & he did xrays to make sure ( we all had pjs with clothes dragged on over ) Fortunatley a happy outcome that time no surgery needed
The only thing each time was the stress I was under. If you think about it how many people get upset tums/gastric probs when they`re worried? So to me it makes perfect sense & perfectly feasable that my dogs had picked up on me being worried/stressed & resulted in them bloating
But just not to worry anybody too much it was pretty extreme worries I had at the time & we all need a little stress to keep the adrenilin & our blood pumping
Christine



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Shadowboxer's Avatar
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Dogs owned: Boxers
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04-06-2005, 08:15 AM   #14

Re: Barf and bloat


So pleased you dogs recovered ok Christine. Bloat is a scary, scary, nightmare.

The fact that your dogs were mother & daughter would tend to lend weight to the findings of the Purdue research regarding family history being an important contributing factor.

Did your vet suggest a gastroplexy as they seem prone to the problem?



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Topdog's Avatar
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Join Date: May 2004
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04-06-2005, 09:53 AM   #15

Re: Barf and bloat


" Yeast Overgrowth & Pathogenic Bacteria -The Root of Allergies and Bloat/Torsion"

Candida Albicans
" Yeast Overgrowth & Pathogenic Bacteria -
The Root of Allergies and Bloat/Torsion"
By Linda Arndt,
author of WATCHWORD, a column
in the Great Dane Reporter Magazine
Leaky Gut Syndrome and Toxic Gut Syndrome can be
the silent killers behind the cause for Bloat/Torsion. In this
article I would like to explore what happens when a system
is overrun with toxic levels of Fungus, also known as Yeast,
and high levels of pathogenic (bad) bacteria.
Candida Albicans is a Fungus/Yeast and a common microorganism
that lives in the gut of a humans and dog. But when there is an
"overgrowth" of this fungus/yeast in the gut, it is called a
Systemic Yeast Infection, and it affects the health and well
being of the whole animal or human.
When the pH balance of the gut is out of balance, and beneficial
bacteria in the gut have been destroyed, this insidious fungus
and/or other pathogenic bacteria can take over and this overgrowth is
very detrimental to our health and well being. One of those
byproducts of a pH imbalance in the gut is bloat/torsion.
What Causes The pH Balance Of The Gut To Be Out Of Balance And
Cause Fungus/Yeast Overgrowth?
1. Overuse of antibiotics - Killing of good bacteria in the gut
2. Poor Nutrition (inadequate protein, too many carbohydrates,
no probiotics, digestive enzymes, dietary enzymes, unusable
minerals)
3. Over vaccinations (i.e. allergies, thyroid problems) - Purdue
Study
4. Thyroid problems = metabolic problems (the body's electrical
system)
5. Hormone stress (seasons, whelping, lactation, vaccines)
6. Stress (environmental, genetic, physical, emotional etc.)
· Anxiousness (males when b###hes are in seasons)
· High strung hyperactive dogs
· Death/loss
· Change in environment - weather/hot, cold
· Change in home or home environment
· Boarding
· Inbreeding -compromised immune system
· Illness that compromises the immune system
· Sensitivity to stimulus (light, sounds, movements)
· Travel (showing)
· Medications
· Flea preparations
· Heartworm medications
· Toxic Gut Syndrome - pathogenic bacteria overgrowth
The results of this yeast - fungus overgrowth manifests itself
in external and internal expressions of disease. Based on
clinical and research studies, Candida overgrowth in your
intestines may create what has been called as "Leaky Gut
Syndrome". Toxins and food allergens may pass through this
membrane and go to other parts of the body, making one feel
generally sick all over. Since antibiotics don't affect fungus/
yeasts, they keep on multiplying and making more yeast, which in
turn, puts out more toxins and weakens the immune system. It is
a vicious cycle. In "Toxic Gut Syndrome," high levels of pathogenic
bacteria such as Clostridial enterotoxemia reproduce at an alarming
rate, causing an overgrowth and causing the animal to bloat.

Some Examples or Symptoms of "External" Expression of a Systemic
Yeast Infection are:
Skin Irritation
1. Itchy skin or feet
2. Licking paws, genital or vaginal area
3. Itchy mouth, throat, face
4. Rubbing nose
Redness, Inflammation and Odor
1. Underarms, Folds of Skin,
2. Inner Thighs, Between Toes, Lips
3. Joint pain
Reoccurring Secondary Bacterial Infections
1. Ears
2. Bladder
3. Skin or Feet
- Sensitivity to light, sound, movement
You can see by this list of symptoms the animal is often
misdiagnosed as having a food or contact allergy, or only a
bacterial infection, when in fact the origin of the disease is
yeast/fungus overgrowth.
Some Examples or Symptoms of "Internal" Expression of a Systemic
Yeast Infection Is:
1. Gastrointestinal tract problems
2. Gas/bloating
- Bloat/torsion
3. Lethargy
4. Depression
5. Fatigue
6. Arthritis
7. Suppressed immune system
8. Inadequate absorption of nutrients
- Other
Other Facts About Candida Overgrowth - Systemic Yeast
Infections.
· Systemic yeast infections (fungus) are extremely difficult to
detect and kill.
· Stanford University studies report a 497% increase in systemic
infections in humans in the past 10 years due to overuse of
antibiotics and stress.
· When pH balance of the gut is out of balance, an environment
is ripe for pathogenic bacteria and fungus to multiply at an
alarming rate.
· The byproducts of bacteria and fungus produce "toxins." These
can result in systemic disease, as well as bloat, stomach gas
and foam.

Many diseases are often misdiagnosed in humans when the actual
underlying cause is Candida Albicans (a systemic yeast
infection). Some examples in humans include:
Fibromyalgia - Chronic Fatigue Syndrome - Some forms of
Schizophrenia (Huxley Foundation Research) - Arthritis or joint
pain - Diabetes - Depression - Schizophrenia - Fatigue -
Lethargy - Mood Swings - Carbohydrate / Sugar cravings
When fungus overgrowth flourishes in the gut, the toxins from
the yeast keep the pH unbalanced, causing a vicious cycle. An
unbalanced pH balance in the gut alters the body's chemistry and
unbalances the metabolic/hormonal chemistry.
Many homeopathic physicians and veterinarians feel as though a
systemic yeast infection is one of the most overlooked and
misdiagnosed diseases in medicine.
Ways to Control Fungus - Yeast Overgrowth
Treatment: External Problems
1. Bathe in sulfur-based or medicated shampoo
2. Prepare a 50/50 mixture of Apple Cider Vinegar & Water
and used as a rinse after the bath.
Note: Do not use Apple cider mixture on open lesions)
Then later on prepare a 2 % solution of Nzymes Oxy-Drops =
Mix 1 teaspoon with 1 cup (8ozs.) of distilled water.
Use this to spray or wipe skin, ears, and feet with to prevent secondary
bacterial infection. - Use the vinegar dip and Oxydrops at different times
of the day so they don't cancel out the effectiveness of each.
One is highly acidic, the other highly alkaline, both are beneficial
used at different times.
Treatment: Internal Problems
NOTE: If an animal or human has Candida Albicans, during the
detoxification process you may witness or experience symptoms
like nausea or loose stools when the fungus starts to die off.
1) Feed a super premium quality meat based diet.
Recommended Brands: Eagle Pack; Precise; Back to Basics; Innova;
Wellness; Wysong; Flint River Ranch; Regal; PHD; Pinnacle, Nature’s
Recipe.
2) Use probiotics/digestive to help maintain the stomach’s
proper pH balance and prevents overgrowth of yeast
and/or bad bacteria.
BacPakPlus-Fortified - Used internally to reestablish the
beneficial flora of the gut. Toll free: 800-872-0073
3) Use dietary/metabolic enzymes to detoxify the body from the
byproducts of the dying fungus and bacteria. One product is:
Nzymes - Toll free: 877-816-6500 - Website: www.nzymes.com
4) Use Nzymes Oxy-Drops to keep fungus and pathogenic bacteria
overgrowth in check. Add diluted Oxy-Drops concentrate to their
food. Put 1 drop per 20 lbs. of body weight, mixed in 2 to 4
ounces of water and pour over the food to make sure it gets in
their system. Oxydrops kills fungus and pathogenic bacteria
because it attacks a particular enzyme, only present in the fungus
and bad bacteria.
Nzymes Oxy-Drops
Toll free: 877-816-6500 - Website: www.nzymes.com

5) Use raw apple cider vinegar (get from health food store) or
lemon juice in the drinking water. This helps maintain the proper
pH balance and establish an environment, which is NOT conducive
to yeast or pathogenic bacteria proliferation.
Apple Cider Vinegar / Lemon Juice Instructions:
Add daily to pet’s water or food Start small to get pet used
to flavor.
Body Weight Amount to Give
10 lbs or less 1/4 teaspoon per day
10 to 60 lbs 1 teaspoon per day
60 lbs and above 2 teaspoons per day

If you using a combination of Nzymes Oxy-Drops and Raw Apple
Cider Vinegar, it is suggested to use the Apple Cider Vinegar in
the water, and the Oxy-Drops (1 drop per 20 lbs.) mixed with
some water and added on the food so they don't cancel out each
others benefits.

RECOMMENDED PRODUCTS
Nzymes Antioxidant Treats - To help flush toxins.
Toll free: 877-816-6500 - Website: www.nzymes.com
Nzymes Oxy-Drops - Use internally and topically.
Toll free: 877-816-6500 - Website: www.nzymes.com
BacPakPlus-Fortified - Used internally to reestablish flora.
Toll free: 800-872-0073
"Yeast Destroyer" - Ears - A natural topical yeast/fungus product from
Doctor's Finest Pet Products - 800 -470 -2001
1doctorschoice.com
Dr. Kruger's Ultimate Supplement - a probiotic product
800-711-8736 www.dockruger.com
For further information I suggest the following books:
The Yeast Connection Handbook -William G. Crook MD
The Candida Control Book - Gail Burton
Linda Arndt
Canine Care Consultant
Blackwatch Great Dane Kennels est - 1973
www.daneworld.com/LindaArndt.htm
Click here: Linda Arndt & Blackwatch Great Danes
info from: http://www.filadog.com/candida_albicans.htm

Post bloat!!!
Goats milk, Yogart, and cheese are really good for the dog... spread out meals and make them small amounts at a time...
Also add carrots both cooked and uncooked, and alittle rice, raw meat or egg (all organic or free-range) add Dr. Schultz superfoods,see:
http://wildchildmagazine.com/display.php?id=56
also might want to try Slippery elm gruel... see:
http://members5.boardhost.com/SUPERNATURAL/msg/162.htm

Activated Charcoal
Organic livestock producers often use activated charcoal to treat animals suspected of being poisoned. Charcoal binds with the ingested toxins (myotoxines, heavy metals, medications, viruses, bacteria) creating a compound that is then excreted from the animal. Activated charcoal is often added to feed to help reduce the impact of intestinal parasites and can be used as treatment for animals suffering from bloat. Activated charcoal is in a powder form and can be mixed in the feed or mixed with water to be used as an oral drench.
for much more info on activated charcoal:
http://wildchildmagazine.com/display.php?id=31&lang=en

See another great article

Understanding Bloat...
http://members5.boardhost.com/SUPERNATURAL/msg/895.html


Info from...and For much more info...

http://supernaturaldogs..com



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Dogsey Veteran
 
Dogs owned: Chihuahuas
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Location: Preston, Lancashire
Posts: 8,648
04-06-2005, 06:02 PM   #16

Re: Barf and bloat


Quote:
Originally Posted by Shadowboxer

The following factors were found to be associated with an increased risk in large breed dogs:
a) Raising the food dish more than doubled the risk for bloat.

Why does everyone always say to feed large breeds with raised food dishes?
Should I not be doing this?



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bellaluna's Avatar
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Dogs owned: Labrador retriever
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04-06-2005, 07:02 PM   #17

Re: Barf and bloat


uhm.. I feed Luna from a raised dish



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Carole's Avatar
Supervisor
 
Dogs owned: boxer
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Posts: 43,651
04-06-2005, 07:03 PM   #18

Re: Barf and bloat


I was thinking about raising Star's dish but decided against it.



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bellaluna's Avatar
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Dogs owned: Labrador retriever
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04-06-2005, 07:06 PM   #19

Re: Barf and bloat


I've been told (once - ages ago) that it would help PREVENT bloat, and now you tell me, its the opposite???

Well Luna really only gets one meal from the bowl.. Her breakfast is spread all over the floor to make her search for it (Yes would be loads better if I had a garden, but I live on the first floor in an appartment building)



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Carole's Avatar
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Dogs owned: boxer
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04-06-2005, 07:09 PM   #20

Re: Barf and bloat


that was the thinking a while ago now things seem to have changed



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