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Legacy23
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10-03-2017, 01:39 PM
Originally Posted by Besoeker View Post
You mean punish?
No, I mean correcting.
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Meg
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10-03-2017, 01:49 PM
Originally Posted by Legacy23 View Post
Chris, you seem like a very reasonable person and I agree with you.

The dog probably does find it uncomfortable. And while I agree it is more pleasant to teach with only positive methods I am not opposed to correcting a dog if they misbehave or disobey.
After over 50 years of working with dogs and owning them I have yet to encounter a dog which 'misbehaves'.

Dogs do things which are natural for their species, we train them to work with us or to behave in a way that fits our lifestyle something which may conflict with a natural behaviour.
If a dog fails do our bidding it is nothing to do with 'misbehaving', they are either exhibiting a natural behaviour or we have failed to adequately train them to carry out our wishes.
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Besoeker
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10-03-2017, 04:49 PM
Originally Posted by Legacy23 View Post
No, I mean correcting.
OK. "correcting" by what means?
Be specific, please.
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Chris
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10-03-2017, 05:32 PM
Originally Posted by Meg View Post
After over 50 years of working with dogs and owning them I have yet to encounter a dog which 'misbehaves'.

Dogs do things which are natural for their species, we train them to work with us or to behave in a way that fits our lifestyle something which may conflict with a natural behaviour.
If a dog fails do our bidding it is nothing to do with 'misbehaving', they are either exhibiting a natural behaviour or we have failed to adequately train them to carry out our wishes.
Totally agree which is another very good reason why we should not use punishment/corrections (semantics) to train them
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Bulldogs4Life
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21-03-2017, 11:37 PM
Put one on and see.
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Wheeler
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22-03-2017, 12:23 AM
Well I used my dogs shock collar about a month ago. My pup was running ahead as he usually does and I noticed him at the bottom of a large ravine looking at an animal, which was a very large raccoon. I called him off loudly as I went down to investigate as something was clearly wrong. I thought that the raccoon might have been in a leg trap, but it was not but could not move. I picked up a stick to check if it was caught and it hissed at me and fell over backwards. There are two possibilities, the raccoon was poisoned or had rabies. As I walked back up the hill my dog went back around to the raccoon, which is when I zapped him off and he came to my side. At which point I leashed him and called the park rangers and had the animal removed for public safety. So don't tell me there is no reason for a collar, or would you let your dog play with the rabid animal? The other choice is never let your dog run free, which is the sad fate of most dogs
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Chris
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22-03-2017, 12:29 AM
No Wheeler. I would just train my dog a recall and leave it command.
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Wheeler
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22-03-2017, 12:42 AM
The difference between my dog and yours, and this is just the truth, is that my dogs find everything, including rattlesnakes. There is no recall from a rattlesnake, if you see one it might already be too late if you have a fast moving dog, so when you do find a snake preferably non venomous the shock collar can be used to teach the dog quickly that all snakes are to be avoided. Again my dogs find something literally every day, mostly pheasants rabbits and deer, but there are also bear around here as well.

This site says that a fox is a dangerous animal in the UK, are bears afraid of them? or coyotes or wolves, or cougars. The UK is playland, as all predators have been killed already, not very ecofriendly https://www.planetdeadly.com/animals...gerous-animals

http://news.bbc.co.uk/earth/hi/earth...00/9167371.stm
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Wheeler
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22-03-2017, 09:23 PM
So what is the most dangerous animal that you have ever encountered on a dog walkabout

Bye the way, a rattlesnake strike comes at 279 meters per second
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tumbleweed
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23-03-2017, 11:05 AM
Originally Posted by Wheeler View Post
So what is the most dangerous animal that you have ever encountered on a dog walkabout

Bye the way, a rattlesnake strike comes at 279 meters per second
We don't have rattle snakes in the UK but we do have Adders but this is not one of them



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